Electrifying Automobiles: Why Range Extended Technology May Only Be Short Term

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In early October, Paris Mayor Ann Hidalgo announced a ban of all gas- and diesel-fueled cars within city limits by 2030, allowing only electric vehicles on its streets. This is another example of increasing legislation to curb carbon emissions and control greenhouse gases.  The Paris announcement follows previous commitments from countries like Norway, France, the UK, China, and India in the ban of future petrol- and diesel-vehicles.

In the quest to improve fuel economy and reduce emissions to meet these increasing government regulations, global automakers have developed several powertrain options.  Electrification is a strategy used by automakers to shift the vehicle from mechanical to electrical power. This move results in more efficient vehicles, by the elimination of mechanical and idling losses. Automakers have developed various levels of electrification to choose from to provide the most efficient vehicles possible.

 

As with any form of technology, each has its advantages and shortfalls. All of them, however, offer significant CO2 reduction opportunities to meet these changing requirements around the world. Integrating various degrees of electrification offers automakers a selection of hybrid and electric vehicle powertrain options. Today’s report will focus on the range extended vehicles.  (For an overview of the various electrification options being employed today, up to and including the fully-electric, zero-emissions category, please see my previous article Electrifying Automobiles: The Multiple levels of Vehicle Electrification.)

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